The Church of England!!!

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By Ruth Millington

Origins- History 

  • The Split with Rome in 1534 occurred as a result of King Henry VIII's desire to divorce and remarry.
  •  Henry had been married to Catherine of Aragon since 1509 and she had borne Henry no male heir.
  •  Henry was anxious to have a son, who would become King upon his death, so in order to secure the succession, Henry wanted to remarry. He had fallen in love with a young courtier called Anne Boleyn.
  • To remarry Henry would need to get the permission of the pope who was the head of the catholic church.
  • Henry quarreled with the pope as he was reluctant to allow the divorce.
  • He broke away from the R.C Church and said that he was now the head of the English church, not the pope.
  • He didn't change any doctrine and so the church can be described as Anglo-Catholic at this stage in history
  • Under Edward VI's reign, the church became protestant and Catholics were prosecuted.
  • Queen Mary, a devout catholic, made the church Roman Catholic again, with the pope as its head
  • Under Elizabeth I reign, they church of England was protestant and remained so with some elements of the R.C church. She called her self the "governor" rather than head.

  

Rowan Williamson

(the head of the church of England)

(Archbishop of Canterbury) 

 Organization- structure of the church

  • The clergy of the church are of three ancient orders: deacons, priests, and bishops. 
  • Except for the celebration of the mass and giving absolution, deacons have the same clerical functions as priests. 
  • Only the bishop can ordain, confirm, and consecrate churches. A bishop is given consecration at the hands of other bishops. 
  • There are two archbishoprics, Canterbury and York, with the Archbishop of Canterbury taking precedence over the Archbishop of York.
  • The church is established, and all Episcopal appointments are still made by the crown; however, the clergy are not paid by the state. 
  • Women have been ordained as deacons since 1987 and as priests since 1994, and in 2005 the church voted to initiate the process that would remove the obstacles in church law to consecrating women as bishops. 
  • Homosexuality is not a bar to ordination, but being in a homosexual relationship is.

Dr Rowan Williams with Bishop Riah during his visit to Jerusalem

Central Beliefs - Worship

The beliefs of Anglicans can be considered quite diverse. The official standard is the Book of Common Prayer but some parts of that book are more clearly doctrinal than others. The ecumenical creeds, both Nicene and Apostles, are used by the Anglican Communion in its worship day by day and week by week. They are ancient and universal statements of Christian faith. In addition, many Anglican churches follow ancient tradition and include the Athanasian Creed among their statements of faith. In modern Anglican churches, a bay or corner at the back of the church, near the entrance, is often reserved for purposes of infant baptism. A font is often used for infant baptism. It symbolizes a Christianís entry into the Church. In traditional Roman Catholic and Anglican churches, the altar will usually be covered with a richly embroidered cloth . A cross and candlesticks with candles will usually stand on the altar. The altar is the focal point of the church because it is a table, which represents the table of the Last Supper. For Roman Catholics and Anglicans the Mass (Eucharist, Holy Communion), which recalls the Last Supper, is very important and is central to worship. The crucifix is a cross with the figure of Jesus on it. The crucifix is usually used to portray the agony Jesus suffered when he died. Crucifixes are particularly associated with the Roman Catholic Church, Anglican and the Orthodox churches 

Rowan Williamson

(the head of the Anglican church)

(Archbishop of Canterbury)

 

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